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Sunday, March 21, 2010

5 Suggestions When Building an e-Course

There are many tips or pointers for people building e-courses. I will add mine to the mix. These are based on personal experience.

1. Keep it simple silly. Just because you have the technology doesn't mean you have to use it all every time.
2. Don't bite off more than you can chew. This also goes with number one about simplicity, keep the lesson short and only focus on one training objective. Keep breaking it down to the lowest common denominator.
3. Nothing is ever as quick as you think it is. It takes time to build a course and more time to build an e-course, period.
4. The devil is in the details. Be neurotic about the course material and appearance. Pay attention to the alignment, spacing, eye appeal, voice overs, scripting and more. Adopt the standards for the Internet and the standardized vocabulary to make it easier for the learner to follow and understand.
5. Test it out on others. You may understand exactly what you mean and ace the e-course every time. Let others be the judge about the understandability of your course. After reflecting on the comments and deciding which warrant implementation, do it. Implement those changes that will improve the e-course.

I am building an e-course for a client and have found that keeping these five rules in mind is helping considerably. There are many more but five to seven things to remember is stretching my capabilities.

3 comments:

  1. I like the five suggestions when building an e-Course. The one I have learned to be the most valuable is number 5. I learned throughout my journey in the Master's program to have others view and critique my work before I submit it. Family members tend to provide an honest answer and ideas/ways to improve the assignment. Friends tend to hold back because they do not want to hurt your feelings.

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  2. Love the 5 rules! As Carla said, it helps to get honest opinions. I used the people I worked with when I designed a tutorial for one of my classes. I had a graduate library student look at it first and she was helpful but already knew what I was trying to teach. However, when I had 2 undergraduate student workers look at the course, I really learned a lot about what I needed. I had to go back and work on making it simpler because they were the level of student I was targeting. And if they, who worked in the library, didn't understand what I was asking, it only follows that my course would not help students who had never been in the library. It was very humbling.

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  3. Excellent points to consider! These factors will help target your audience and provide just what they need to complete a task. Giving excessive information can overwhelm one and discourge him/her from completing the task or completing it but not to their fullest potential. Will definitely keep these points in mind.

    Thank you!

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